Golden Gate Bridge Closure Reminds Us to Plan Ahead

Golden Gate BridgeBy now you’ve probably received the word:  The Golden Gate Bridge will be closed to vehicle traffic from 12:01 a.m. Saturday, January 10 to 4:00 a.m. Monday, January 12.  If you had to use the bridge to get to where you are going, then you’ve probably made alternate plans or re-arranged your schedule.  If you haven’t,then we recommend visiting 511.org to see what your options are.

Advanced notice is helpful—it helps you plan ahead.  Emergencies work the same way.  A little planning makes things a little bit easier when the unexpected happens.  So what should your plan include?

Plan SF72

A little foresight can go a long way—make a plan now, so you know how to find and get in touch with your people when something happens. The same connections that are important in everyday life—with friends, family, neighbors, and communities—are even more crucial in a crisis.

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Shake Up Call

Last night’s magnitude 6.9 earthquake off of the coast of Eureka, California was reminder that we live in earthquake country.  Thankfully, there were no reports of injuries or damage and the ocean tremor did not generate a tsunami.

Judy was in Tokyo, riding the train to the airport, when the 8.9 Tōhoku earthquake struck. Her immediate reaction was simple: to reach out to her digital networks, and let them know what was happening. Tomorrow, March 11 is the 3rd Anniversary of the Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami.

Earthquakes can happen at any time with little or no warning.  That’s why it’s important to take simple steps now so we’re ready for any emergency.

Get Connected: When disaster strikes, we come together to help each other. Getting prepared is about knowing your neighbors, saying hi to the regulars at the local market, and staying in touch with family and friends—both digitally and in person.

Gather Supplies: Whether you’re just starting out or a preparedness pro, gathering your emergency supplies is easy. A good rule of thumb is to have supplies for about 3 days, or 72 hours. You’ll be surprised at how much you already have.

Make a Plan with your People: A little foresight can go a long way—make a plan now, so you know how to find and get in touch with your people when something happens. The same connections that are important in everyday life—with friends, family, neighbors, and communities—are even more crucial in a crisis.

For more information visit www.sf72.org.  SF72 is your hub for emergency preparedness. You’ll find information about what to do in an emergency, simple steps to get connected, and useful guides to help you get prepared.

DEM Talks Tsunami Preparedness with KGO-7

Deputy Director Rob Dudgeon talks to the Bay Area’s KGO-7 about Tsunami Preparedness. San Francisco plans for all emergencies including Tsunamis. For tips on how to prepare for tsunami or any disaster visit www.72hours.org. You can also see if you live or work in a Tsunami Inundation Zone.

DEM talks Tsunamis with a Reporter

Deputy Director Rob Dudgeon Talks Tsunami Prep with KGO-7

Fear Factor

A volcano in the city.

Here comes the apocalypse!

Nothing grabs headlines like fear.  In some circles, yesterday’s earthquake in Southern California was cast as a foreshock to the apocalypse.  Cue the scenes of a volcano erupting in Los Angeles and an asteroid hurling towards earth. Somebody better call Tommy Lee Jones and Bruce Willis because we need a hero!

Are we scared yet? Okay, now let’s all take a step back from the ledge.

Yesterday’s 4.7 tremor?  A simple reminder we live in earthquake country– instead of believing the hype, let’s take small steps towards individual and community resilience.

A shadow puppet

Ever done this before? Then you probably have a flashlight stashed away in case the power goes out.

You are more prepared than you think! If the power goes out, you have a flashlight handy, and you know who can pick up your kids if you get stuck at work. You adapt and move on – disaster averted! By managing everyday life you already have what it takes.  So take simple actions now to make life easier when an earthquake happens!

72 hours is a great starting point for preparedness – it’s the first step in preparing yourself and your family for a disaster. Simple tips include keeping a bag of stuff to get you by for 3 days, having an out-of-state contact, and making sure your  family has a safe meeting spot.

So what about heroes? Who is going to save the day?  You will – and so will your neighbors.

In the event of an emergency, communities come together. Past disasters – from Sandy to Fukushima – have proven resilience because of people helping each other.  Being prepared is not just about getting your supplies together; it’s about knowing your neighbors, lending a hand, and sharing your knowledge and skills to help your community.

Neighbors handing out food to others

New Yorkers helping neighbors after Super Storm Sandy.

Take the time to meet your neighbors – at home, at work, or through social networks.  After all, these are the people we rely on everyday no matter the crisis!

For more small steps and ways to get connected check out:  www.72hours.org.  You can also check out our SFHeroes app for mobile devices!