Tsunami Preparedness 101

San Francisco DEM

This week marks national Tsunami Preparedness Week and DEM wants San Francisco to know what to do in the event of tsunami hitting our shorelines.

Tsunamis are NOT like normal waves at the beach. When they approach land they are like a surge or fast flood. Earthquakes are nature’s warning for a possible tsunami, so if you are by the coast and the earth moves, first: Drop, cover, and hold on; second: When the shaking stops, get to high ground; and third: stay away from the coast.

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Sometimes it takes many hours for the first waves of a tsunami to reach the shoreline, and often times the first waves (or surges) are not the highest or most powerful.  Whether we are under a tsunami advisory, watch, or warning it is imperative that anyone in coastal areas listen to DEM’s instructions.  Our primary methods of issuing the notification are AlertSF

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Scientists Confirm: We Live in Earthquake Country

San Francisco DEM

Today the U.S. Geological Survey released a new earthquake forecast that California will experience an earthquake 8.0-magnitude or greater within the next 30 years.  Aside from the specific geological explanation about what will happen when certain faults move, most of us already know that we live in an earthquake-prone region. But psychologically, the thought of a looming disaster that could happen in five minutes or nearly a third of a lifetime from now can feel scary, daunting, and…intangible.  So often times we push the thought out of our minds and focus on something that’s more pressing and timely, even though we know we shouldeventuallyget prepared for a major earthquake.

But here’s the thing about earthquake preparedness—we’re not trying hunker down in our bomb shelters as the zombie apocalypse destroys any vestige of our social structure; it’s really just about having enough food and water on hand to make…

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Spring Forward (& How’s Your Stored Water Supply?)

San Francisco DEM

It’s that time of year!  Where we set our clocks forward and lose that hour of sleep we wish we had on Monday morning. Daylight saving time also is a good time to make sure you have enough emergency water.

One gallon of water per person per day is what you want to have on hand for emergencies.  This supply should be replaced every six months, so how about starting this bi-annual routine this weekend?

For more information on storing water visit the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission. http://sfwater.org/index.aspx?page=540.

And while we’re checking on our water supply, how about checking your smoke alarm batteries (and replace as needed!), too? Here’s to a very SF72 (AKA prepared) spring and summer!

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