Keep Your Cool, San Francisco

San Francisco DEM

It’s going to be pretty hot in San Francisco over the next few days. That said, we want to remind everyone of some good public health recommendations (brought to us by our friends at the San Francisco Department of Public Health) to keep us cool and comfortable today and tomorrow.

It is important to check regularly on adults at risk, especially the isolated elderly.

Visit at‐risk adults at least twice a day and watch them closely

for signs of heat exhaustion or heat stroke.

So, the basics:

  • Drink fluids frequently throughout the day, before you feel thirsty.
  • Check on the elderly regularly.
  • Don’t leave children or pets in the car!
  • Take cool showers/baths.
  • Limit outdoor activity, especially during the hottest part of the day.
  • Take frequent breaks in the shade when spending time outside.
  • Wear light‐colored, light‐weight clothing and a hat.
  • Avoid alcoholic beverages and caffeinated drinks.
  • Use an air conditioner if you have one.
  •  If you do not have an air conditioner, go to a cooler place such as an air‐conditioned family’s,
    friend’s or neighbor’s home, store, mall, museum, or movie theater, or, visit a cooling center.
  • Check on your at‐risk family, friends and neighbors often and help them get to a cool place.
  • Fans alone will not keep you cool when it is really hot outside.
  • Conserve by setting your air conditioner to 78 degrees and only cooling rooms you are using
    when you are at home.
  • Avoid strenuous activity, or plan it for the coolest part of the day, usually in the morning.
  • between 4 a.m. and 7 a.m. or in the evening. If you exercise, drink two to four glasses of cool,
    nonalcoholic fluids each hour.  A sports beverage can replace the salt and minerals you lose in
    sweat. If you are used to regular exercise, just keep in mind the symptoms of heat illness when
    exercising and stop or rest if any occur.
  • Bathing or showering with cool (not cold) water can be helpful for those able to do so safely.
  • It is important to check regularly on adults at risk, especially the isolated elderly.  Visit at‐risk
    adults at least twice a day and watch them closely for signs of heat exhaustion or heat stroke.

Heatwave Pic_5-13-2014

Looking for cooler places to hang out? Check out the SF72.org crisis map for exact locations of cooler environments (think community centers, movie theater, libraries, swimming pools and/or shaded parks).

For more information about heat waves and and how to prevent heat illness, check out SFDPH’s Frequently Asked Questions about Heat Waves and Heat Illness  .

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San Francisco, Open Your Golden Gates!

Every April 18th we commemorate the anniversary of the San Francisco Earthquake and Fire with a combination of tradition and ceremony. This year, we added one more element to the activities: connection.

The tradition component is demonstrated when we gather at Lotta’s Fountain at five in the morning with our fellow San Franciscans (some of us in 1906 period attire) to mark the moment when the earthquake struck.

The ceremony includes a sing along of the universally well know “San Francisco” song as we prepare to change locations to the Golden Hydrant in Dolores Park, which gets a fresh coat of gold paint from native San Franciscans every April 18th at dawn.

And new to the mix this year is connection, when we announced the partnership between DEM and the private social network for neighborhoodsNextdoor.

Here’s the photo recap of DEM’s (and SF72’s) commemoration activities, that always leave us with a renewed sense of San Francisco pride.